Victim Assistance and the Review Conferences: Maputo 3RC

Posted on April 23, 2014



The Maputo Summit: Victim Assistance, Disability Rights at the Mine Ban Treaty’s  Review Conferences

The Mine Ban Treaty’s Third Review Conference will take place from 23 to 27 June 2014 in Maputo, Mozambique. It will mark a critical moment in the Treaty’s history, taking place 15 years after the Treaty’s entry into force and the First Meeting of States Parties in 1999, which was also held in Maputo. The Maputo Review Conference will assess the progress made to date and provide a roadmap for the work ahead.

The Maputo Review Conference is a formal diplomatic meeting of the 161 States Parties to the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention. It has the potential to build upon the successes of the 2004 Nairobi Summit and the 2009 Cartagena Summit by being one of the most important events in victim assistance history since the Mine Ban Treaty was opened for signature in December 1997.

The 2004 First Review Conference – the Nairobi Summit on a Mine-Free World – decided on a plan of action including a commitment that States Parties would ensure that national legal and policy frameworks effectively address the needs and fundamental human rights of mine survivors, by establishing as soon as possible, legislation and policies and assuring effective rehabilitation and socio-economic inclusion services for all persons with disabilities.

The 2009 Second Review Conference – The Cartagena Summit on a Mine-Free World, saw the States Parties reaffirm their understandings of, and commitments to, victim assistance, which had evolved through ten years of implementation during which time new developments in other instruments of disarmament and human rights law had advanced.

Among the key developments was recognized to have been the entry into force of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The comprehensive manner in which the CRPD records what is required to promote the full and effective participation and inclusion of persons with disabilities, including mine survivors, also provides a new standard by which to measure victim assistance efforts. Another was the Convention on Cluster Munitions, which further codified victim assistance as treaty law.

It was also decided at the Second Review Conference that victim assistance should be integrated into broader national policies, plans and legal frameworks related to disability, health, education, employment, development and poverty reduction.

The majority of civil society national campaigns advocating for the implementation of the CRPD, contribute to efforts to assist survivors. Many States Parties to the Mine Ban Treaty are also parties to the Convention on the rights of Persons with disabilities, and committed to promoting activities and implementation across the two conventions.

Therefore, it is expected that the Maputo Review Conference will offer opportunities for stronger linkages and better outcomes for survivors, as well as other persons with disabilities.

Also check out the ISU fact page: Why Maputo?

The international community has made a solemn promise to mine victims. Unlike the destruction of emplaced or stockpiled mines, efforts to fulfil this promise must continue for years. Returning to Maputo fifteen years after the 1MSP is significant. In 1999 the international community first expressed that a comprehensive approach to victim assistance is required with our efforts being part of broader approaches to health care, rehabilitation and human rights. As a developing country, Mozambique knows that ensuring the full participation of all citizens, including mine victims, in the social, cultural, economic and political life of a nation is a tall order. This Convention has made a great difference. However, as an added value, the Maputo Review Conference is a chance to again leverage high level international interest to continue momentum in this area and revive the Convention in a changing and new environment. – See more at: http://www.maputoreviewconference.org/why-maputo/#sthash.dKEwuyjE.dpuf
The international community has made a solemn promise to mine victims. Unlike the destruction of emplaced or stockpiled mines, efforts to fulfil this promise must continue for years. Returning to Maputo fifteen years after the 1MSP is significant. In 1999 the international community first expressed that a comprehensive approach to victim assistance is required with our efforts being part of broader approaches to health care, rehabilitation and human rights. As a developing country, Mozambique knows that ensuring the full participation of all citizens, including mine victims, in the social, cultural, economic and political life of a nation is a tall order. This Convention has made a great difference. However, as an added value, the Maputo Review Conference is a chance to again leverage high level international interest to continue momentum in this area and revive the Convention in a changing and new environment. – See more at: http://www.maputoreviewconference.org/why-maputo/#sthash.dKEwuyjE.dpuf

“The international community has made a solemn promise to mine victims.”

Unlike the other treaty provisions such as the destruction of emplaced or stockpiled mines, efforts to fulfill this promise must continue for a lifetime:

Returning to Maputo fifteen years after the 1MSP is significant. In 1999 the international community first expressed that a comprehensive approach to victim assistance is required with our efforts being part of broader approaches to health care, rehabilitation and human rights. As a developing country, Mozambique knows that ensuring the full participation of all citizens, including mine victims, in the social, cultural, economic and political life of a nation is a tall order. This Convention has made a great difference. However, as an added value, the Maputo Review Conference is a chance to again leverage high level international interest to continue momentum in this area and revive the Convention in a changing and new environment.

The ICBL calls on states to make commitments to victim assistance:

We commit to give greater priority to victim assistance and improve the availability and accessibility of services in areas where victims live by 2017, in accordance with our national action plan. We will strengthen the sustainability of assistance by engaging relevant ministries such as Ministry of Social Affairs and by coordinating between relevant ministries to increase resources for victim assistance by 2015.

Victim assistance is not complete unless it is available for the lifetime of all victims, as needed. But States Parties may be said to have completed their Mine Ban Treaty obligations under Article 6.3 when they have ensured that they are adequately and sustainably meeting the needs and protecting the rights of landmine victims, including through broader frameworks such as those for development or disability.

The international community has made a solemn promise to mine victims. Unlike the destruction of emplaced or stockpiled mines, efforts to fulfil this promise must continue for years. Returning to Maputo fifteen years after the 1MSP is significant. In 1999 the international community first expressed that a comprehensive approach to victim assistance is required with our efforts being part of broader approaches to health care, rehabilitation and human rights. As a developing country, Mozambique knows that ensuring the full participation of all citizens, including mine victims, in the social, cultural, economic and political life of a nation is a tall order. This Convention has made a great difference. However, as an added value, the Maputo Review Conference is a chance to again leverage high level international interest to continue momentum in this area and revive the Convention in a changing and new environment. – See more at: http://www.maputoreviewconference.org/why-maputo/#sthash.dKEwuyjE.dpuf

Banner image (c) Giovanni Diffidenti: Mozambique; teacher& landmine survivor, 13 September 2001. ICBL Image Library.

Posted in: VA processes