The Mine Ban Treaty & the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Posted on April 17, 2013



The Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention and The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: A Common Agenda

A statement presented by Paramdeep Mtharu, of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention Implementation Support Unit (ISU) on the 9th Session of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Geneva,  15 April 2013: read the full text here.

The Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention (Mine Ban Treaty) and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) share a common agenda in that the 161 States that are part to this disarmament treaty have accepted not only that they shall eradicate anti-personnel weapons, but also that they shall provide for the well-being and guarantee the rights of women, girls, boys and men whose lives have been irreversibly changed by these insidious, indiscriminate and long-lasting remnants of war.

P. Mtharu

Paramdeep Mtharu & Professor Ron McCallum. Images: Courtesy Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention ISU

As the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay said at the Twelfth Meeting of the States Parties of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention: “when survivors of mines and other explosive devices acquire a disability they fall under the scope of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.”

Based upon the experience of the implementation of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention, the parties to all relevant conventional weapons instruments have accepted a non-discriminatory and rights-based approach.

As the former Chair of the Committee, Professor Ron McCallum, stated in his 2011 foreword to the ISU’s publication on assisting survivors in the context of disarmament, disability and development: “the impact of international humanitarian law, starting with the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention, in addressing the rights and needs of persons with disabilities should not be under-estimated.”